Category Archives: Healthy Foods

Olive Oil? Oh Yes ~

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#SundayFamilyDayAtHome

Olive oil! Extra virgin of course 😉
Apart from being an excellent all-natural hair treatment used for ages, and that I prepare at home, do you know the #newestbenefitsofextravirginOliveOil ? Here they are according to the world’s healthiest foods:

Cancer prevention has been one of the most active areas of olive oil research, and the jury is no longer out on the health benefits of olive oil with respect to cancer. Twenty-five studies on olive oil intake and cancer risk—including most of the large-scale human studies conducted up through the year 2010—have recently been analyzed by a team of researchers at the Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research Institute in Milan, Italy. Firmly established by this research team were the risk-reducing effects of olive oil intake with respect to cancers of the breast, respiratory tract, upper digestive tract and, to a lesser extent, lower digestive tract (colorectal cancers). These anti-cancer benefits of olive oil became most evident when the diets of routine olive oil users were compared with the diets of individuals who seldom used olive oil and instead consumed diets high in saturated added fat, especially butter.

Time to get this as part of your kitchen pantry, F&F 😉

#SundayFamilyDayAtHome #FamilyLove #DIYathomeorganichairtreatment #AlmondOliveOil #NaturalBeautyCare

🌎 #DomingoDeFamiliaEnCasa #AmorDeFamilia
#HazloTuTratamientoOrganicoDePelo #AceiteDeOlivaAlmendras
#CuidadoDeBellezaNatural

When In Traffic… ~

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When in traffic, eat an apple, and promote healthy eating!

Its the end of the work day, and as I’ve said before I carry healthy snacks with me in my vehicle to coast peacefully and calmly through traffic;) So when at at a red light, why not share a healthy experience?

Do you really know the new and beneficial benefits found about Apples? According to The World’s Healthiest Foods, here they are:

What’s New and Beneficial About Apples

  • The phytonutrients in apples can help you regulate your blood sugar. Recent research has shown that apple polyphenols can help prevent spikes in blood sugar through a variety of mechanisms. Flavonoids like quercetin found in apples can inhibit enzymes like alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase. Since these enzymes are involved in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates into simple sugars, your blood sugar has fewer simple sugars to deal with when these enzymes are inhibited. In addition, the polyphenols in apple have been shown to lessen absorption of glucose from the digestive tract; to stimulate the beta cells of the pancreas to secrete insulin; and to increase uptake of glucose from the blood via stimulation of insulin receptors. All of these mechanisms triggered by apple polyphenols can make it easier for you to regulate your blood sugar.
  • Even though apple is not an excellent source of dietary fiber (it ranks as a “good” source in our WHFoods Rating System), the fiber found in apple may combine with other apple nutrients to provide you with the kind of health benefits you would ordinarily only associate with much higher amounts of dietary fiber. These health benefits are particularly important in prevention of heart disease through healthy regulation of blood fat levels. Recent research has shown that intake of apples in their whole food form can significantly lower many of our blood fats. The fat-lowering effects of apple have traditionally been associated with its soluble fiber content, and in particular, with the soluble fiber portion of its polysaccharide component known as pectins. What we now know, however, is that whole apples only contain approximately 2-3 grams of fiber per 3.5 ounces, and that pectins account for less than 50% of this total fiber. Nevertheless, this relatively modest amount of pectins found in whole apples has now been shown to interact with other apple phytonutrients to give us the kind of blood fat lowering effects that would typically be associated with much higher amounts of soluble fiber intake. In recent comparisons with laboratory animals, the blood fat lowering effects of whole apple were shown to be greatly reduced when whole apples were eliminated from the diet and replaced by pectins alone. In summary, it’s not fiber alone that explains the cardiovascular benefits of apple, but the interaction of fiber with other phytonutrients in this wonderful fruit. If you want the full cardiovascular benefits of apples, it’s the whole food form that you’ll want to choose. Only this form can provide you with those unique fiber-plus-phytonutrient combinations.The whole food form of apples is also important if you want full satisfaction from eating them. Researchers have recently compared intake of whole apples to intake of applesauce and apple juice, only to discover that people report less hunger (and better satiety, or food satisfaction) after eating whole apples than after eating applesauce or drinking apple juice. But especially interesting was an additional finding about calorie intake following apple consumption. When healthy adults consumed one medium-sized apple approximately 15 minutes before a meal, their caloric intake at that meal decreased by an average of 15%. Since meals in this study averaged 1,240 calories, a reduction of 15% meant a reduction of 186 calories, or about 60 more calories than contained in a medium apple. For these researchers, “getting ahead” in calories with a net reduction of 60 calories was a welcomed outcome of the study, and an extra benefit to their study’s primary conclusion—the importance of whole apples (versus other more processed apple forms) in helping us manage our hunger and feeling more satisfied with our food.
  • Scientists have recently shown that important health benefits of apples may stem from their impact on bacteria in the digestive tract. In studies on laboratory animals, intake of apples is now known to significantly alter amounts of two bacteria (Clostridiales and Bacteriodes) in the large intestine. As a result of these bacterial changes, metabolism in the large intestine is also changed, and many of these changes appear to provide health benefits. For example, due to bacterial changes in the large intestine, there appears to be more fuel available to the large intestine cells (in the form of butyric acid) after apple is consumed. We expect to see future studies confirming these results in humans, and we are excited to think about potential health benefits of apple that will be related to its impact on bacterial balance in our digestive tract.

Eat This Fruit To Burn Fat And More… ~

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Good Morning and Buenos Dias!
Continuing with healthy eating inspiri, motivi, ans stimuli, let’s talk Metabolism… Want to turn your body into a Fat-Burning machine? Eat more of another fruit I Love, Grapefruit!

According to Medical Daily, ‘Grapefruit provides us with benefits other than vitamin C — from protecting us against certain cancers to boosting our metabolism — keeping us in good health.’

Continued, as per Medical Daily, are the 6 Unexpected Health Benefits Of Grapefruit:

1. Strengthens Immune System

It is well known any fruit rich in vitamin C will strengthen and support our immune system. Vitamin C works with other micronutrients that provide good and regular nourishment for the body. Micronutrient deficiencies of vitamins A, B6, C, and E have been found to alter immune responses in animals and are thought to have a similar effect on the human immune response.  

Maintaining good levels of vitamin C in the body can reduce the severity of cold symptoms, acting as a natural antihistamine. This makes it helpful in controlling allergies, since it reduces histamine levels. “Grapefruit is abundant in vitamin C which help supports the immune system,” Blake said. “Half of a grapefruit provides about 78 percent of your recommended daily intake of Vitamin C.”

2. Boosts Metabolism

Grapefruit is a popular diet staple among those looking to lose weight. A high metabolism can continue to burn fat in the body even when it is resting. A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food found people who ate half a grapefruit before each meal, without making any other dietary changes, lost an average of 3 and a half pounds over 12 weeks.

The copious amount of enzymes, high-water content, and less sodium helps burn fat easily. Blake said: “While grapefruit does not have any magical fat-burning properties, it is low in calories and is a good source of fiber, which helps keep us full for longer by taking longer to digest. … Grapefruit also has a high water content which can help you feel full and stay hydrated.”

3. Reduces Kidney Stones Risk

Naringenin — known for its bitter taste of grapefruit — has been found to successfully prevent the formation of kidney cysts. According to a report by AlphaGalileo.org, the naturally occurring compound regulates the PKD2 protein that is responsible for the condition. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects not only help prevent the formation of cysts, but also reduce swelling in the kidneys that is caused by fluid retention. Drinking up to a liter of grapefruit juice daily will help reap the greatest benefits in effectively blocking the formation of kidney cysts.

4. Fights Gum Disease

Simply eating two grapefruits a day can prevent and even reverse damage caused by gum disease. A 2005 study published in the British Dental Journal found the daily consumption of grapefruit can reduce gum bleeding for those who suffer from gum disease. The participants in the study also showed an increase in their vitamin C levels, which aids in the repair of gums. Vitamin C, according to Blake, is essential for healthy gums, which helps keep our teeth firmly in place.

5. Protects Against Cancer

The antioxidant vitamin C has been linked to decrease the risk of certain cancers. A 2006 study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry found grapefruits help repair damaged DNA in human prostate cancer cells. Naringenin stimulates DNA repair in these cancer cells and protects the body from developing cancer.

“Diets high in vitamin C, which is an antioxidant found in many fruits and vegetables such as grapefruit, had been linked to a reduced risk of cancers of the stomach, colon, bladder, breast, and esophagus,” said Blake. She cautions these results are specific to vitamin C rich foods, rather than supplements.

6. Reduces Stress

You don’t necessarily have to ingest grapefruit to reap its benefits. The smell of citrus fruit can make a difference on curbing our stress and anxiety levels, and depression. A 1995 study published in the Japanese Journal of Psychopharmacology found citrus fragrance restored stress-induced immunosuppression, and induced calm behavior in mice.

Chanté Floreani, an apothecary Artisan and founder of Root Down Botanicals, believes natural fragrance and the science of aromatherapy can inspire well-being of mind, body, and spirit through the “therapeutic power of plants.” Floreani’s three blends, which includes grapefruit to “energize and cheer,” is used in the morning to get the day started with energy and mental alertness. “Each is formulated to respond to the emotional shifts we experience throughout our day by harnessing the therapeutic qualities of pure essential oils,” Floreani told Medical Daily in an email.

Well, my Friends? I believe it speaks for itself… Bring more Grapefruits into the diet for better health. 🙂

Cooling Foods For Summer

Jubilee-Strawberries

We should eat according to the seasons…

Cooling foods have the ability to clear heat and toxins, “cooling and calming the blood and nourishing yin.” If the body is too yang or hot, the following symptoms may occur:
perspiration, thirst, constipation, pungent odorous wind and stools, burning of the anus area after bowl movement, anxiety, red eyes, red face, emotional, headaches, vivid dreams, ulcers in the mouth or tongue, cold sores around the mouth, red tongue with a thick yellow coating on the tongue, rapid pulse, heart burn and dark or yellow urine.
As stated in ‘The World’s Healthiest Foods”, a research study that was conducted in 1997 by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in London, England, showed significant differences were found in the nutrient content in certain foods.  Iodine was higher in the winter; beta-carotene was higher in the summer. And researchers in Japan found three-fold differences in the vitamin C content of spinach harvested in summer versus winter.

In summer, it is suggested for us to stick with light, cooling foods in the tradition of traditional Chinese medicine. To deal with the symptoms mentioned here, especially in the summer months, try to include the following foods in your diet and see if the symptoms are healed.
These foods include fruits like strawberries, apple, pear, and plum; vegetables like summer squash, broccoli, cauliflower, and corn; and spices and seasonings like peppermint and cilantro.
Other foods in an article in Mens’ Fitness magazine, known to keep the body cool naturally are cucumbers, watermelons, peaches, pineapple, leafy greens, lemon, and zucchini.
More cooling summer foods? Add peppers, avocados, coconut, melons, romaine lettuce, specifically, and mushrooms;)
Try them all and see how you can create a very diversified summer diet!

20 + 2 Ways To Have A Healthier Thanksgiving!

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From my Healthy Living Blog~>

Thanksgiving is this (on its way next) week. For those trying to stick to a weight-management or health program, having a holiday that’s centered completely around food may seem like a diet apocalypse. But it doesn’t have to. Start planning now, and Thanksgiving can get you off to a good — and healthy — start to the entire holiday season.

Here are 20 ways you can have a healthier Thanksgiving:

Before Thanksgiving

1. Our first tip comes courtesy of Dr. Melina Jampolis, internist and board-certified physician and nutrition specialist, who specializes exclusively in nutrition for weight loss and disease prevention and treatment. She suggests, eating “clean” to “get a head-start on preventing holiday weight
gain.”

Consider one of the following: replace one meal per day with a protein shake, double your vegetable intake, or add interval training to your exercise regimen to burn extra calories. Click here for some great protein shake recipes. Jampolis also talks about eating healthy during the holidays in this interview.

2. Do a pre-holiday colon cleanse. Rid your body of accumulated junk, and motivate yourself to keep it clean during the tempting buffets of the holiday season.

Planning Your Menu

3. Lighten up your recipes with less fat, sugar and calories; add more whole grains, vegetables and fruit.

4. Connie Diekman, former President of the American Dietetic Association, suggests using fat-free broth to baste your turkey (in place of butter) and make your gravy (in place of fat-laden drippings). She also suggests replacing sugar with sugar substitutes, and pureed fruit in place of oil in baked goods. You can also try plain yogurt or fat-free sour cream in creamy dishes, such as mashed potatoes, casseroles and dips.

5. Look for healthful dishes. The Internet is full of healthful and traditional Thanksgiving recipes.

Thanksgiving Day

6. Start your day with a small but satisfying breakfast with protein and whole grains, like Nature’s Harvest. It will help give you more control over your appetite.

7. Start some physically active holiday traditions. Instead of just watching football games, organize your own Turkey bowl with family, friends and neighbors. Go on a pre-dinner or post-dinner walk. Many communities offer Thanksgiving Day 5K runs and family strolls.

The Meal

8. Manage pre-meal nibbles. Don’t fill up before the main event. Choose some raw fruits or vegetables.

9.  Survey all of the options before loading your plate. Decide what
you want, and skip the things you don’t.

10. Start filling your plate with the more healthful dishes, leaving a smaller amount of room on your plate for the extra-rich stuff.

11. Don’t waste your calories on foods you can have all year long. Fill your plate with small portions of holiday favorites that only come around once a year.

12. Choose wisely: (for those who eat meat) white meat over dark, plain vegetables over saucy ones, roasted sweet potatoes over sweet potato
casserole.

13. Indulge in favorites—even unhealthy favorites. Just keep your portions small.

14. Eat slowly, putting your fork down and enjoying conversation between bites. Savoring each mouthful, and as well as the presence of friends and family, is the surest way to feel full and satisfied with just one plate of food.

15. Go easy on the alcohol.

16. Drink plenty of water.

17. Skip seconds.

18. Wait a few hours before eating dessert. Fill the time with a family walk
or active game in the backyard, (or in the house).

19. Be realistic. The holidays are a time of celebration. With busy schedules and lots of tempting food, it may be a time to shift into a mindset of weight
maintenance, rather than weight loss.

20. Remember what Thanksgiving is really about. Thanksgiving is about family and friends. Focus on gathering to give thanks together rather than just on the buffet.

*And here are my personal +2 Tips on Having A Healthier Thanksgiving:

1. With the weather getting colder, people tend to exercise less and eat larger portions during the holidays. All this causes less calorie burning efficiency. What to do? Incorporate more Green Tea into your diet. If you don’t particularly enjoy the taste of liquid green tea, I’ve recommended it in an herbal concentrated capsule form giving excellent results since each capsule is the equivalent of 10 cups of liquid Green Tea and after a meal to help increase metabolism .

2. Increase calorie burning by sprinkling Capsicum in your meals! With the cold weather here Capsicum is perfect in that it warms the body, increasing body temperature, and increases blood flow to all extremities. Digestion is also improved by adding this simple seasoning in a concentrated powder form so no bloating or gas after meals.

In answer to questions regarding holiday indigestion and to improve digestion, use Digestive System Pack. (Because you know you might just over eat…)

Wishing you All an exquisite Thanksgiving Holiday!~

Eating Disorders: 19 Signs And The Difference Between How Caucasian Americans And African Americans Are Affected

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More Americans than you can imagine have some type of eating disorder. Ranging from Women to American teenage girls. Appearance and competition is one of the major reasons as to why we have such a high percentage of these women dealing with these disorders. Bone thin is seen, most times, as the health standard by people with eating disorders. Luckily, curves are slightly more acceptable now when you see posters, billboards, and commercials on TV today.

Men, are not completely exempt. Body builders make great models and men in show business compete with ever-thinner rivals, and can suffer reduced testicular functions from starving.

There a are 3 major eating disorders:

  1. Bulimia is one of the most common eating disorders. This disorder consists of consuming of huge amounts of food in a very short time period and then making yourself vomiting to purge it from the system. Dentists are the first to diagnose it because frequent vomiting erodes tooth enamel.
  2. Anorexia is self-starvation. Characteristics include a distorted body self-image, extreme preoccupation with food, and sometimes binge eating.
  3. Orthorexia. This eating disorder consists of a person who becomes obsessed with dietary purity to the point where it becomes self-destructive.

Do you have an eating disorder? Ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Do you feel overweight/fat regardless of what your body weight is?
  2. Have you failed time and again to diet and fail to lose weight?
  3. Do you still think you’re fat even after losing a good amount of weight?
  4. Do your weight loss goals match what you “should” be according to your height?
  5. Do you fast or put yourself on incredibly strict diets where you become totally preoccupied with food?
  6. Do you have a rigid eating routine?
  7. Do you eat when under stress, pressure, or depressed?
  8. Do you prepare food for everyone else, and then refuse to eat it? (Anorexics often do this.)
  9. Are you a compulsive exerciser?
  10. Does guilt take over you if you miss exercising?
  11. Do you feel fat because you missed a regular exercise schedule?
  12. Are you hiding your eating habits from others?
  13. Is your self-esteem linked to your eating habits?
  14. Do you feel out of control of your life?
  15. Does guilt take over you if you eat dairy, meat, high-fat or high-calorie vegetarian foods?
  16. Do you binge, or eat large amounts of food in short periods of time?
  17. Have you tried to “correct” your “pigging-out” by using chemical laxatives, vomiting, or fasting? (Bulimics are usually malnourished as well as extremely thin, because vomiting and excess laxative use discharge most of their nutrients.)
  18. Has your body changed in a negative unhealthy way since you changed to a strict unhealthy diet? Such as in harder stools? Slower pulse rate? Cold hands and feet? Bloating and water/fluid retention? Slower metabolism? Lack of menstrual period?
  19. Do you “look” different? Is it an unhealthy look? Yellow teeth? Bone loss? Tooth decay? Dull, brittle hair, dry hair? Dry skin? (Anorexics at times develop a layer of thin, downy hair, called lanugo, which helps them keep warm when body fat becomes dangerously low.) (Bulimics have a swollen neck, broken blood vessels on face and eroded tooth enamel from excessive vomiting.)

If you answered yes to 2 or more of these questions, then consider balancing the body to treat an eating disorder.

Here are the latest Eating Disorders Statistics according to ANAD (The National Association of Anorexia Nervosa And Associated Disorders Inc.):

• Almost 50% of people with eating disorders meet the criteria for depression.1
• Only 1 in 10 men and women with eating disorders receive treatment. Only 35% of people who receive treatment for eating disorders get treatment at a specialized facility for eating disorders.2
• Up to 24 million people of all ages and genders suffer from an eating disorder (anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder) in the U.S.3
• Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.4

Students:
• 91% of women surveyed on a college campus had attempted to control their weight through dieting. 22% dieted “often” or “always.”5
• 86% report onset of eating disorder by age 20; 43% report onset between ages of 16 and 20.6
• Anorexia is the third most common chronic illness among adolescents.7
• 95% of those who have eating disorders are between the ages of 12 and 25.8
• 25% of college-aged women engage in bingeing and purging as a weight-management technique.3
• The mortality rate associated with anorexia nervosa is 12 times higher than the death rate associated with all causes of death for females 15-24 years old.4
• Over one-half of teenage girls and nearly one-third of teenage boys use unhealthy weight control behaviors such as skipping meals, fasting, smoking cigarettes, vomiting, and taking laxatives.17
• In a survey of 185 female students on a college campus, 58% felt pressure to be a certain weight, and of the 83% that dieted for weight loss, 44% were of normal weight.16

Men:
• An estimated 10-15% of people with anorexia or bulimia are male.9
• Men are less likely to seek treatment for eating disorders because of the perception that they are “woman’s diseases.”10
• Among gay men, nearly 14% appeared to suffer from bulimia and over 20% appeared to be anorexic.11

Media, Perception, Dieting:
• 95% of all dieters will regain their lost weight within 5 years.3
• 35% of “normal dieters” progress to pathological dieting. Of those, 20-25% progress to partial or full-syndrome eating disorders.5
• The body type portrayed in advertising as the ideal is possessed naturally by only 5% of American females.3
• 47% of girls in 5th-12th grade reported wanting to lose weight because of magazine pictures.12
• 69% of girls in 5th-12th grade reported that magazine pictures influenced their idea of a perfect body shape.13
• 42% of 1st-3rd grade girls want to be thinner (Collins, 1991).
• 81% of 10 year olds are afraid of being fat (Mellin et al., 1991).

For Women:
• Women are much more likely than men to develop an eating disorder. Only an estimated 5 to 15 percent of people with anorexia or bulimia are male.14
• An estimated 0.5 to 3.7 percent of women suffer from anorexia nervosa in their lifetime.14 Research suggests that about 1 percent of female adolescents have anorexia.15
• An estimated 1.1 to 4.2 percent of women have bulimia nervosa in their lifetime.14
• An estimated 2 to 5 percent of Americans experience binge-eating disorder in a 6-month period.14
• About 50 percent of people who have had anorexia develop bulimia or bulimic patterns.15
• 20% of people suffering from anorexia will prematurely die from complications related to their eating disorder, including suicide and heart problems.18

Mortality Rates:
Although eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder, the mortality rates reported on those who suffer from eating disorders can vary considerably between studies and sources. Part of the reason why there is a large variance in the reported number of deaths caused by eating disorders is because those who suffer from an eating disorder may ultimately die of heart failure, organ failure, malnutrition or suicide. Often, the medical complications of death are reported instead of the eating disorder that compromised a person’s health.

According to a study done by colleagues at the American Journal of Psychiatry (2009), crude mortality rates were:

• 4% for anorexia nervosa

• 3.9% for bulimia nervosa

• 5.2% for eating disorder not otherwise specified

Athletes:
• Risk Factors: In judged sports – sports that score participants – prevalence of eating disorders is 13% (compared with 3% in refereed sports).19
• Significantly higher rates of eating disorders found in elite athletes (20%), than in a female control group (9%).20
• Female athletes in aesthetic sports (e.g. gynmastics, ballet, figure skating) found to be at the highest risk for eating disorders.20
• A comparison of the psychological profiles of athletes and those with anorexia found these factors in common: perfectionism, high self-expectations, competitiveness, hyperactivity, repetitive exercise routines, compulsiveness, drive, tendency toward depression, body image distortion, pre-occupation with dieting and weight.21

Even after seeing all these stats, anorexia is rare among African-Americans. An article in psychology today states that in fact, not a single black woman, in a study done on anorexia in 2011, met criteria for anorexia in the earlier 12 months, and there were no reports at all of anorexia in Caribbean adults. Interestingly, however, the age of onset for anorexia was lower for African-American adults (14.9 years) compared with late adolescence as seen in an earlier similar national study with primarily White participants (18.9 years), and there were no cases among African-Americans occurring after age 19. These findings show that Black Americans are at lower risk of anorexia than their White counterparts, and Caribbean Blacks are at an even lower risk. Although when African-Americans do have anorexia, the age of onset is lower and the course of the disorder is longer. The lower rates of anorexia are thought to be due to less of an emphasis on thinness in African-American culture operating as a protective factor.

Lifetime prevalence rates found for bulimia in Black Americans is 1.5% for adults, which is slightly higher than the national average of 1.0%. The average age of onset is 19 years, which is the same as the general population. Thus, rates of bulimia among Blacks may not be as uncommon as once believed. This finding could be a sign that Black people do feel pressure to conform to the American ideal of thinness, contributing to the higher rate of bulimia, although not to the more extreme level that is connected to the development of anorexia.

Binge eating was the most prevalent eating disorder among Blacks in the NSAL, with a lifetime prevalence of 1.7%, although 5.1% had some problems with binge eating whether or not they met criteria for a disorder. Males were significantly less likely to binge than women, but may have more issues around behaviors that emphasize an athletic build. While most eating disorders had an age of onset during adolescence, binge eating had the highest age of onset (22.8), which is similar to the general population. This older age of onset may reflect less of a concern for smaller body size and may represent more of a reaction to stress. Lower incomes and stress due to racism may have an effect on the drive to binge as a coping mechanism.
As in previous research, adult women had higher prevalence of eating disorders than men in the NSAL study. There were no gender difference in eating disorders among teens, but there was a tendency for boys to exhibit more disordered eating behaviors during adolescence. There is some research that indicates this could be due to weight restrictions for sports participation, such as school football, boxing, wrestling teams, etc. Therefore, Black boys should not be considered immune to eating disorders.

Taken as a whole, research shows that cultural differences must be taken into account when considering eating disorders in African-Americans. Clinicians should be prepared to recognize and treat groups that may be least likely to develop an eating disorder. This will require training to work with diverse cultural groups to ensure that appropriate treatment is provided. Professionals should be educated to possible differences ing prevalence, age of onset, persistence and gender differences in eating disorders, including differences among subgroups of Black people. The social climate and subculture in which a person was raised may effect the risk and course of development of an eating disorder. Earlier and more frequent screening of eating disorders in Black communities may be a critical component to capturing cases of these disorders.

If you or someone you know has an eating disorder, use the following natural herbal therapy combination (a combination I have used with patients and clients with marvelous success) to help the body heal from emotional imbalances, normalize appetite and metabolism, regulate mood-appetite brain chemicals, control stress reactions, stimulate digestion and nutrient assimilation, maintain an ideal weight, increase energy, and to bring in green whole superfoods, all considered lifesavers:

NATURE’S HARVEST

CHINESE NEGATIVE PACK

SUPER TRIO

*Note: There is a well-known link between sexual abuse and eating disorders. Chinese medicine is known to balance emotionally and physically. Western herbs do not do it the same. For this reason I recommend the Chinese Negative Pack in all programs involving eating disorders.

Focus on optimal nutrition, Friends and Family. Herbs and roots along with fruits, vegetables, and wholesome whole grain foods, were placed here on this earth to keep us on a path of optimum health.

8 Natural Metabolism Boosters [Infographic]

There are many ways to increase your metabolism. For most people it starts with the right diet and exercise. An efficient metabolism also requires the smooth running of many complex body processes that rely on sufficient antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin C and the B vitamins, and sometimes supplements are required to correct any deficiencies. There are also a variety of herbs and spices that can boost your metabolism. Here are eight of them:

Herbs that Boost Your Metabolism

Tumeric
That spice that’s in almost every curry — that’s turmeric. It has been reported to increase metabolism by increasing bile production within the body, as well as lowering blood sugar levels. Be careful with curry, though. Curries are full of creams and fats that do anything but increase your metabolism. Further Turmeric (or Curcumin) benefits are that it can help detoxify your blood and support a healthy inflammation response. Turmeric or Curcumin should be taken with peperine or black pepper to help with bioavailability.

Cayenne Pepper
Cayenne pepper helps support body fat by increasing oxygen consumption. Cayenne pepper may also support blood pressure, blood circulation, and digestion. Capsicum is a natural stimulant without the threatening side effects (palpitations, hyper-activity or rise in blood pressure) like most other stimulating agents. Cayenne’s primary chemical ingredients include capsaicin, capsanthin, beta carotene, flavonoids, and vitamin C. Cayenne Pepper is a very high source of Vitamins A and C, has the complete B complexes, and is very rich in organic calcium and potassium.

Cinnamon
It is known as an “insulin mimicker” meaning it minimizes the amount of insulin your body produces after a meal by transporting sugar molecules into cells within the body. Cinnamon also may slow down the emptying of the stomach after a large meal, leaving you to fill fuller and less likely to snack. Now, cinnamon rolls don’t count. Cinnamon is also an ingredient in our new product, Sweet FX.

Kelp
Kelp is a natural thyroid stimulant, which may support metabolism. Kelp, as well as other seaweeds, raise metabolism in two ways: they affect the thyroid gland and they increase basal metabolic rate (the speed at which your body burns calories while at rest). Iodine, an important component of kelp, has a direct effect on basal metabolic rate. Kelp is believed to stimulate a thyroid hormone which is responsible for boosting metabolism. By returning the iodine levels to normal, it can help alleviate low-grade hypothyroidism. Kelp contains large amounts of potassium, and naturally varying amounts of trace minerals, which may be useful in maintaining proper glandular function and metabolism. Some medications for high blood pressure can increase potassium levels in the blood. Taking Kelp along with some medications for high blood pressure might cause too much potassium in the blood.

Ginger
Studies by ICMR (Indian Council of Medical Research) show ginger supported the digestion process by absorbing the necessary nutrients into the system and regulated the metabolism cycle. The gingerol is the majorly active component in ginger. Such active components in ginger activate the muscular activity in the digestive track and stimulate the chemical reactions in the digestive system. Ginger is an important ingredient used in the traditional Ayurvedic medicines to support the metabolism and digestive system. Researchers have found that ginger may help settle the stomach during times of occasional nausea, motion sickness and morning sickness.

Yerba Mate
A stimulant similar to caffeine, this herb can also increase blood pressure. Yerba Mate is also is a good source of antioxidants. It also contains many nutrients like potassium, chromium, iron, niacin and magnesium. Yerba Mate suppresses your appetite and increases energy levels, therefore stimulating the ability to burn unwanted calories faster. Yerba Mate contains a content named mateine, which increase metabolism and energy. It also help you to get rid of allergy symptoms, act as a gentle diuretic and colon cleanse, nutritionally speed up the healing process and decrease stress. Yerba mate can be used in as a tea drink. It is also found in a supplement pill or energy drink. Those who are on blood pressure medication or are sensitive to stimulants should avoid Yerba Mate.

Green Tea
Green tea is a thermogenic agent, which means, that you may burn more calories. Green Tea is also a stimulant which contains powerful antioxidant, as well as, caffeine. The antioxidants found in green tea also aids in energy production. It can also be found in capsules for those who do not wish to make tea. The chemical in green tea, or Green Tea extract, known as EGCG (or epigallocatechin gallate) is known to speed up your metabolism, among many other benefits.

Bitter Orange
Bitter Orange which is an extract of Seville oranges is a stimulant and works on receptors in fat tissues.

Are High-Carbohydrate Diets Bad for Your Brain?

Want better brain function? Maybe you should lay off the carbs, especially sugar and processed grains.

Recent research from Tufts University links high carbohydrate intake to greater risk of mild cognitive impairment. Diets heavy in sugar and complex carbohydrates, such as processed grains, could particularly contribute to risk by affecting the body’s glucose and insulin metabolism.

“Cognitive deficits have been observed in older people with impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin insensitivity and diabetes are risk factors for cognitive decline and dementia,” said Tammy Scott, PhD, a scientists at Tufts HNRCA Nutrition and Neurocognition Laboratory. “We’re not certain about the mechanisms, but possibilities include increased oxidative stress and impaired transport of glucose to the brain.”

Related Infographic: 13 Super Brain Foods You Can Find in the Grocery Store.

Related Product: Carbo Grabbers with Chromium

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, reported that people 70 and older who ate the most carbs in relation to protein and fat were at nearly four times the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment. Risk also rose with a diet heavy in sugar. on the other hand, study participants who consumed more protein and fat relative to cars were less likely to become cognitively impaired.

“We think it’s important that you eat a healthy balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat,” Roberts said, “because each of these nutrients has an important role in the body.”

In this study, not everyone with mild cognitive impairment went on to develop Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, but many did.

“If we can stop people from developing mild cognitive impairment, we hope we can stop people from developing dementia,” Roberts said.

Participants in the study who reported the highest carbohydrate intake at the beginning of the study were about 2 times likelier to develop mild cognitive impairment. But those with diets high in fat were 42% less likely to suffer cognitive impairment. And those with a higher intake of protein had a relative reduced risk of 21%.

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Which Carbs Contribute Most to Cognitive Decline?

  • High carbohydrates impact your glucose and insulin metabolism. “Sugar fuels the brain — so moderate intake is good. however, high levels of sugar may actually prevent the brain from using the sugar, similar to what we see with type 2 diabetes,” Roberts said.
  • Simple carbohydrates that are low in fiber, such as pasta, white bread and other refined grains, cause spikes in blood sugar because the body quickly converts them into glucose.
  • Whole grains, beans and vegetables retain the fiber and nutrients of the grain’s bran and germ, which are lost in processing. Because these carbs are digested slower, they have a less dramatic effect on blood sugar — and thus may be better for the brain.

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